Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life

 

Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life

From the ICP website:

On view from September 14, 2012 – January 6, 2013 at the International Center of Photography (1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street), Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life offers an unprecedented and comprehensive historical overview of the pictorial response to apartheid that has never been undertaken by any other museum. Through its images, this exhibition explores the significance of the 50-year civil rights struggle, from how apartheid defined and marked South Africa’s identity from 1948 to 1994, to the rise of Nelson Mandela, and finally its lasting impact on society.

Curated by Okwui Enwezor with Rory Bester and based on more than six years of research, the exhibition examines the aesthetic power of the documentary form – from the photo essay to reportage, social documentary to photojournalism and art – in recording, analyzing, articulating, and confronting the legacy of apartheid and its effect on everyday life in South Africa.

The facts:
Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life
September 14, 2012 – January 6, 2013
The International Center of Photography
1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street
New York, NY 10036
Phone: 212 857-0000
www.icp.org

Photo above:
Eli Weinberg, Crowd near the Drill Hall on the opening day of the Treason Trial, December 19, 1956. Times Media Collection, Museum Africa, Johannesburg.

All photographs copyright the artist.


Greame Williams


Jodi Bieber, Protest against Chris Hani’s assassination, 1993. © Goodman Gallery Johannesburg.