Roman Vishniac Rediscovered

 

 

Roman Vishniac Rediscovered at the ICP.

From an ICP press release:

Roman Vishniac Rediscovered, on view at the International Center of Photography (1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street) January 18–May 5, 2013, brings together four decades of work by a remarkably versatile and innovative photographer. The exhibition includes recently discovered vintage prints, moving film footage, personal correspondence, and exhibition prints made from Vishniac’s recently digitized negatives. His complex and visionary work, much of which is shown here for the first time, reveals a compositional acuity, inventiveness, and surprising stylistic range that solidifies his place among the 20th century’s most accomplished photographers.

Vishniac created the most widely recognized and reproduced photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. Yet only a fraction of his work was published during his lifetime, most notably in A Vanished World (1983). Over the course of his career, Vishniac witnessed the sweeping artistic and photographic innovation of Weimar Berlin, the ominous rise to Nazi power in Germany, the final years of Jewish life in Eastern Europe, and immigrant life in America during and after the war.

“By repositioning Vishniac’s iconic photographs of Eastern Europe within the broader tradition of social documentary  photography,  and  introducing  recently  discovered  and  radically diverse bodies  of  work, this exhibition stakes Vishniac’s claim as a modern master,” said ICP Adjunct Curator Maya Benton, who organized the exhibition.

The facts:
Roman Vishniac Rediscovered
January 18, 2013 – May 5, 2013
The International Center of Photography
1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street
New York, NY 10036
Phone: 212 857-0000
www.icp.org

Photo above left and below:

Roman Vishniac, [Jewish schoolchildren, Mukacevo], ca. 1935–38. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

Roman Vishniac, [Street scene with swastika flag in background, Berlin], ca. 1935–36. © Mara Vishniac Kohn. Courtesy International Center of Photography

Roman Vishniac, [Zionist youth learning construction techniques while building a school and foundry, Werkdorp Wieringen, The Netherlands], 1939. © Mara Vishniac Kohn. Courtesy International Center of Photography